Creative: Visual Diary Peru #004

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My Peru trip is complete. Three weeks that felt like three months. This is what happens when you cover so much ground the week prior disappears from memory. A great group of people who blended well together and brought a wide range of personalities and flair. Modern Peru is very different from the Peru of old.

Three weeks can only provide a taste of what the country has to offer.

Flying out from Cusco to Lima, I had a window seat. Looking down on dirt roads switchbacking up incredible mountain faces made me want to abandon my life, load up the Himalayan, and head south. (Or load up the Salsa and do the same.) The lure of the Andes is strong and I feel like even after three trips I’ve not yet scratched the surface. My wife asked if I would return to teach again. I said “Yes,” and also said, “I want to return to the Amazon.” Such more to do, so little time.

I placed experience over photography on this trip, and I’m glad I did. I still walked away with images I liked, and the journal I will create will be solid. The X100V is the perfect teaching camera due to its size and weight but I’m not sure it would be the camera I would use were I focused on my own work. (I will explain this more in an upcoming Q&A.) Traveling like this is a privilege. I’m old enough to understand this and appreciate what I’ve been given. Latin America is endless and I love it.

Comments 11

  1. Interesting video. Looking forward to that Q&A on the X100V. How did it cope in that rain and sleet? I’m wondering if you have the weatherproof kit on there if you also have that lens hood. Any thoughts on using polarising filters for this kind of camera?

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  2. Interesting that the 100v love affair may have been but a passing flirtation…

    In the ideal world of money not being a problem, a fixed-lens camera in traditional 135 format, for me, would be either (or both) a fixed, 24mm shifter (forget tilts) and/or a fixed 50mm. I spent much time on the 35mm focal length, but that wasn’t a situation devoid of choices: the other lengths were always available; that’s quite a different equation. Perhaps it’s the difference between 6×6 and the 135 shape, but a Rollei tlr with a fixed 80mm or 75mm doesn’t create the same space difficulties if you face a single camera and lens option, and is seems a kinder deal if it’s the only one on offer.

    I really like longer lenses more than wide or normal, but the fixed-lens deal must really offer a wider range of uses than does a longer focal length; can’t guarantee the future would be nothing other than headshots. You can always crop, but the opposite is a tad more difficult. I write as one with zero interest in landscape pix.

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      The X100V is a really solid camera. And depending on how and what you shoot, it might be the best thing out there. For me it’s great for certain things and not great for others, like most cams.

  3. Really enjoyed this series. Looks of useful insights. Mostly regarding having fun and not taking things too seriously.

    Lots of cool shirts as well. Might have to purchase some 🙂

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      It really is mostly about the shirt. Wearing the same ones again and again while hand washing in sinks and rivers. I like to take certain things seriously but never myself.

  4. Interesting video. Looking forward to the Q&A on the X100V. How did it cope in that rain and sleet? And does a lens cap work with that lens hood?

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      That camera will handle anything you can throw at it. It’s a really solid camera. I’ve not had any issue with any digital camera when it comes to weather since the original Canon 5D.

    2. Thanks. Sorry, something weird happened and my original message wasn’t showing as sent, and I retrieved my notes from a Word doc and then sent another version of the message. Thanks for replying to both. I have the same camera but had to wait five months this year on a waiting list for mine, having mistakenly passed on the option of joining a much shorter waiting list two years ago. So far, so good.

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