Create: Books I Love, Episode 001

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I thought I needed to undertake even MORE filmmaking adventures. My wife and I have a serious photobook collection and I thought it would be useful to share some of these beauties and also share why I think they are so wonderful. I also thought it would be useful for those who envision the photobook as being an integral part of their future. Long Story Bit by Bit, Liberia Retold by Tim Hetherington is well worth your time, attention and money.

There is simply no comparison between looking at photography online, or on a screen, and looking at the same work in book form. There have been digital breakthroughs over the years but all have faded and vanished in very short amounts of time. I don’t consider social to be looking at work because what I’ve experienced is that social viewers can’t remember what they have seen even minutes after their viewing experience ends. (I’ve been asking people for over five years.)

Also, a book like the one I feature here is the work of a TEAM of highly skilled individuals each bringing specific expertise to the table. The photographer is the backbone but the others are equally critical when it comes to the book itself. (Umbrage) These books are testaments, they are permanent and require a level of critical thinking sorely lacking in much of our fast-paced society. The book, in some ways, is the antithesis of modern culture, and for this, I love it even more.

Comments 10

  1. one of the best. books and humans. wish he was still here.

    that one sits on the shelf next to ‘infidel’, VII’s ‘war’, lynsey addario’s ‘Of Love and War’ and anastasia taylor-lind’s ‘Portraits from the Black Square’.

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      Sean,
      I remember when I heard they had been killed. It was like a gut punch. I didn’t know him by any means but still a neck punch.

    2. have you read ‘here i am’ or watched ‘which way is the front line from here’? both are excellent. also, there was a series on netflix called ‘conflict’. not sure if it’s still there but worth a watch. a couple of the photographers they interviewed were with tim and chris hondros on that day in misrata. it was a huge loss to have both of those guys die on the same day.

      sebastian junger, who was tim’s partner on a lot of assignments (they did restrepo together), has a great body of work as well.

      i know it’s crazy but i honestly believe that would have been the perfect line of work for me.

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      Sean,
      I”ve seen or read most of that. Have not seen which way to the front line but I will. Also saw Conflict, which I was hot and cold on because people do that work for all kinds of reasons. Some good, some not so good. So what the person says is very important to me. Their knowledge of history, of theatre, etc. Tim and Chris were solid. I’ve seen a lot of other folks who are doing it so they can act look at LA cocktail parties. I would never last five minutes in that world.

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      Paul,
      I think you can find it for $150. Still a lot of cheddar but worth finding at a library as well. Photoeye might have it.

  2. I’m late to your You-Tube videos, Dan (but that means I get to binge).

    I really get the feeling that we, the viewer, are getting the benefit of your degree in photojournalism. Thank you.

    Chris Boot, as I recall, did a lot of work with Magnum photographers?

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